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home QRZCQ - The database for radio hams 
 
2019-09-22 11:01:02 UTC
 

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LB2TB

Active QRZCQ.com user

activity index: 3 of 5
sticker

Lars Roksund
Kraftveien 12
N-3406 Tranby
Norway, NO

EU
norway
image of lb2tb

Call data

Last update:2019-09-16 15:39:35
QTH:Tranby, Nr. Oslo
Continent:EU
Views:1566
Main prefix:LA
Class:A
Federal state:NO
Latitude:59.8230271
Longitude:10.2712242
Locator:JO59DT
DXCC Zone:266
ITU Zone:18
CQ Zone:14

Most used bands

20m
(18%)
30m
(17%)
80m
(13%)
17m
(13%)
15m
(12%)

Most used modes

CW
(93%)
SSB
(8%)
RTTY
(1%)

QSL dataUp to date!

Last update:2019-09-06 13:51:39
eQSL QSL:YES
Bureau QSL:YES
Direct QSL:YES
LoTW QSL:YES

Biography

Dear friends,

SWL since 1978 (Age 12). I was "on the air" for the first time in the evening of 26th January 1981. The novice license only allowed me use CW and 15 Watts output on the HF-bands (LB was a novice license back then). First QSO was with DL5JP on 40 meters at 20:05 UTC. On my 16th birthday (sep 1981), I started using LA5EBA as callsign (Class-A license). On 17th October 2008, after 27 years as LA5EBA , I received permission to use my old "vanity" callsign again - still with full privileges.

I graduated from the radio officer training school at age 17 with a Radio Officer 2nd class certificate issued on my 18th birthday. After a year at sea, I upgraded to 1st class. Then, "suddenly", I had to go to the navy and do my service there. I was a radio operator in the Norwegian Coast Guard (Coastguard vessel "Senja"). I also served as a radio operator in the Army. Both in Bergen and Oslo area. I worked several years in the Norwegian Foreign Ministry as a radio operator in charge of daily radio communication with Norwegian embassies in approx. 40 countries around the globe. I spent several years as a radio technician for the same employer, dealing with communication both home and abroad at the embassies. Total visited 76 UN countries.

Today I am 53 yrs old and work as a Marine Radio Surveyor, performing survey on GMDSS installations on ships. I also do the practical examination of new ROC and GOC candidates (maritime certificates).

Until now, I have been chasing DX without a beam. 324 DXCCs and 2417 slots for the Challenge are confirmed. I am QRV more or less every day, even though I am still at work every weekday.... I am QRV on all HF bands - 99% CW. Mostly Ragchewing, but also looking around for a new slot - and sometimes a new DXCC. Having fun with my Begali Paddle, the Vibroplex Deluxe Bug or my simple morse key...

Worked DXCCs:

Equipment

Rig:
Yaesu FTDX5000
ACOM 1000 (1kW amp)

Antenna system:
Palstar AT4K (Antenna tuner)
Doublet: 2 x 39,5 meter (2 x 130 ft) - up abt 20M (65 ft) - my only TX antenna.
26M vertical spiderbeam pole with 4 x 40M elevated radials - only for RX (9:1 UNUN)

Keyers:
J36 Chrome (Replica) from I1QOD
Begali Magnetic Classic
Vibroplex Deluxe Bug
EB (Elektrisk Bureau) straight key

Also in shack:
Elecraft K3 (upgraded)
Elecraft KPA500 (500W amp)

...and more...


DX Code Of Conduct

dx code of conduct small logoI support the "DX Code Of Conduct" to help to work with each other and not each against the others on the bands. Click here and find out more about the project and how you can endorse it.

Other images

second pic
LB2TB / Pic 2
  

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